Trying to become addicted to “slow and steady”

I’ve been reading about how our desire for quick dopamine fixes has led to our smart phone addictions. (“Did anyone reply to my Tweet yet?”) When something new shows up on our phone, we get a quick shot of dopamine that makes us feel good. We like that feeling so we seek out ways to get another shot.

As soon as I read this, I was convicted that this was exactly what I was doing. I hope that “admitting that you have a problem is the first step to recovery.” I think being conscious of this has helped, at least a little so far.

The constant pursuit of the quick dopamine fix competes with spending time on long-term goals. Losing weight, writing a book, starting a new venture – none of these can happen instantly, overnight, or even in a few days or weeks. They require plodding, day after day, continued effort. That’s nowhere near as fun as the instant gratification you get when some “Likes” the picture from your recent trip.

“Gamification” has entered our vocabulary in the past few years. It’s why apps like Waze and Foursquare award you points for participating. Points and trophies make you feel like you are accomplishing something, even if it’s virtual.

When I think of gamification, it makes me think of someone else trying to get me to use their app, service, etc. more frequently than I otherwise would. But – you can use the same principal on yourself to help “addict” yourself to the daily grind on the path to your long-term goals.

Some fitness apps do this for you. The FitBit app rewards me for meeting my exercise goal 5 days in a row.

Try to gamify (“gamificate”?) your projects and goals. Do you want to write a book? Set a very reachable goal, something like – write 300 words a day. In 6 months, you’ll have written about 200 pages. Remember that 180 days x a few pages/day > 180 days x 0 pages/day.

This multiplying effect is the key to long-term success.  Just like the tortoise – slow and steady wins the race.

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